Products

Our Production

Gran Selezione DOCG

Enhanced by a long aging process, first in wood and then in bottle, Casa Sola’s Gran Selezione aims to highlight the elegant side of Sangiovese.

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Riserva DOCG

In the finest vintages, we select our best Sangiovese to craft our reserve wine.

By paying close attention to every step of the winemaking and aging process (starting with wood and then bottle aging), we aim to enhance its characteristics, adding complexity and roundness.

casasola riserva 2011 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Chianti Classico DOCG

The Chianti Classico from Casa Sola is known as the wine that captures the intensity and freshness of our terroir. We’ve paired Sangiovese’s austere elegance with a small blend of Canaiolo, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Merlot to increase its complexity, all the while preserving our regional identity.

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Montarsiccio IGT

It is no surprise that the world’s most popular varieties have also shown excellent expression here at Casa Sola. Since 1987, at Casa Sola, we have been blending Cabernet and Merlot – renowned for their robust fruitiness and supple tannins – with a touch of Sangiovese in our Montarsiccio.

Esteemed as a ‘Supertuscan’ for its deep aromas and velvety structure.

casasola montarsiccio 2009 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Pergliamici Rosso IGT

Designed to be an easy-drinking wine, fruity and fresh, Pergliamici seeks to revisit the legacy of Chianti Classico by presenting a modern take on the flavors and sensations of the past.

A straightforward, honest wine, that is perfect for sharing with friends.

casa sola - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Pergliamici Bianco IGT

Designed to be an easy-drinking wine, fruity and fresh, Pergliamici seeks to revisit the legacy of Chianti Classico by presenting a modern take on the flavors and sensations of the past.
A straightforward, honest wine, that is perfect for sharing with friends.

1 - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Vin Santo

We follow tradition by hanging freshly picked Malvasia and Trebbiano grapes. In a dedicated ventilated room, we let the clusters dry for about 4 months to concentrate the sugars. After a gentle pressing, the must is fermented and aged in small barrels (caratelli) for 5 years.

casasola vinsanto big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Olio Evo DOP

The Chianti Classico DOP ExtraVirgin Olive Oil boasts a centuries-old tradition passed down from generation to generation, dating back to the 14th century.

Combining Frantoio, Leccino, Correggilo, and Moraiolo olives in harmonious balance, Casa Sola’s Chianti Classico DOP olive oil stands out for its subtly spicy flavor, accompanied by a gentle bitterness, and exceptional nutritional qualities.

casasola olio bottiglia 050 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Olio Evo DOP

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casasola olio bottiglia 050 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Wine Classification

The universe of Italian wines is a fascinating and complex kaleidoscope of flavors and fragrances. If you find yourself bewildered by the numerous classifications and designations, don’t worry: this brief guide will lead you through our country’s rich oenological heritage.

Together, we will unveil the meaning behind wine classification and explore the main categories, from simple table wines to prestigious DOCG wines.

Wine classification is a system of specific rules imposed by a “Disciplinary,” which establishes which places, which grape varieties can be used, and in what proportion, to produce a particular wine.

Italian wines are divided into four categories:

Stretching between the cities of Florence and Siena, the production area covers 70,000 hectares.

The Chianti Classico territory exhibits significant diversity.

These wines are not subject to any disciplinary and do not carry any geographical indication. Labels cannot indicate the grape varieties used or the vintage. They typically represent the lowest quality category of wine.

Identifies wines that come from a specific geographical area. They must be made from grapes harvested in the mentioned area, at least 85%. Labels can mention the production area and the grape varieties used, but it is not obligatory.

These wines are produced in vineyards listed in a well-defined area where production yield per hectare, grape varieties used, alcohol content, and aging are specified. These wines must undergo a chemical-physical analysis before being marketed.

This is the most prestigious category. These wines must comply with strict disciplinary rules and undergo rigorous controls: they undergo chemical-physical analysis and tasting before bottling. A specific “seal” must be affixed to the bottle neck or cork.

To differentiate wines with different characteristics but belonging to the same designation, additional indications can be used. In the case of Chianti Classico, these include Annata (Vintage), Riserva, and Gran Selezione.

Qualitative Hierarchy of Chianti Classico

In 2014, the production regulations for Chianti Classico underwent a significant overhaul with the introduction of a new category that stands at the top of the qualitative pyramid for this DOCG: Gran Selezione, alongside the existing categories of Chianti Classico Annata and Riserva.

According to the latest production regulations, Chianti Classico labels are divided into Annata, Riserva, and Gran Selezione.. The main distinctions between the three categories primarily concern aging time:

  • For Chianti Classico Annata, the first commercial release date is October 1st of the year following the vintage.
  • For Riserva, a minimum of 24 months of aging is required, with at least 3 months in the bottle, starting from January 1st of the year following the vintage.

For Gran Selezione, a minimum of 30 months of aging is required, with at least 3 months in the bottle, starting from January 1st of the year following the vintage.

Additionally, Gran Selezione wines must meet standards of chemical and organoleptic excellence.

For Gran Selezione wines, it is mandatory that the grapes come exclusively from company-owned vineyards, and every batch of Chianti Classico must pass organoleptic tests and chemical analyses before being released on the market. A suitability certificate issued by the control body is required to obtain the state marks (DOCG seals) for each approved batch.

The geology of Chianti Classico is a fundamental part of its identity and unique terroir. The soil is predominantly of a limestone nature, with various rock formations, including marly and clayey limestones, as well as fossilized marine sediments. This geological composition contributes to the soil’s ability to retain moisture and provide good drainage for vine growth. Moreover, erosion over the millennia has created different sun exposures and microclimates that influence grape maturation. In summary, the geology of Chianti Classico imparts distinctive character, complexity, and aromatic intensity to its wines.

Sangiovese,the primary grape variety used in Chianti Classico production, stands out for its high sensitivity to external influences and its remarkable ability to reflect the specific soil’s characteristics in which it grows. This phenomenon is not random; only in certain areas does Sangiovese best express its extraordinary qualities.

Supertuscans

Supertuscan wines are renowned in Tuscany for their exceptional quality and are characterized by not belonging to any specific designation of origin. This allows the producer greater stylistic freedom.

They are often associated with the use of international grape varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah, but it’s worth noting that some prestigious Supertuscans use exclusively Sangiovese grapes.

Their history dates back to the 1960s and 1970s when some Tuscan producers decided to break away from the rigid rules of origin designations, offering more identity-driven wines, initially for an international clientele.

Distinctive characteristics of Supertuscans include full grape maturity, aromatic intensity, robust structure, and aging potential. They often feature aromas of black fruit, spices, Mediterranean herbs, and a rich, round taste with silky tannins.

Supertuscans pay tribute to the innovation and great passion of Tuscan producers who challenged tradition to create unique wines.

Pairings

The great versatility of Chianti Classico allows it to be paired with a wide variety of dishes: it has long been the ideal accompaniment to traditional Tuscan recipes, but it also pairs excellently with dishes from many other international cuisines.

It is excellent with grilled red meats, game dishes, roasts, braised dishes, and aged cheeses. Chianti Classico has also excelled in unusual pairings, including highly spiced ethnic dishes from Chinese and Indian cuisines, and sushi.

To best enjoy Chianti Classico, the bottle should be opened a few hours in advance to allow the wine to breathe and release all its aromas. The ideal serving temperature is 16-18 degrees Celsius:higher temperatures risk overwhelming the bouquet with alcohol, while lower temperatures accentuate the perception of acidity. A tulip-shaped glass with a slightly narrowing mouth is best for enhancing the bouquet of Chianti Classico.

Chianti Classico Vintages

2000: A shortened vegetative cycle, a mild spring, and favorable climatic conditions marked this vintage. Abundant flowering in May, followed by a hot summer that accelerated the phenological stages. September’s beneficial nighttime rains balanced the grape must’s concentration and enhanced aromas. Result: Structured wines.

2001: High-quality vintage with regular climatic patterns and uniform grape maturation. Low rainfall from May to June, followed by a warm August and September, contributed to good ripening. September rains supported optimal harvesting conditions in October. Result: Substantial wines.

2002: A cold and rainy year, with below-average temperatures and grape ripening challenges, including Sangiovese mold issues. Selective harvesting resulted in lower quantities but improved quality. Result: Delicate wines.

2003: A hot and dry summer with few rains led to contrasting chemical-physical and organoleptic requirements compared to the previous year. Exceptional conditions produced ripe grapes with enological potential, accelerating maturation and enabling a rapid harvest. Result: Rich wines.

2004: In Chianti Classico, 2004 was characterized by a very regular climatic pattern. The season started late due to 2003’s water stress, benefiting from well-distributed precipitation that allowed optimal grape ripening. These factors have contributed to a slow and steady ripening, resulting in musts with a good balance between sugar content and acidity. This vintage produced wines reflecting Chianti Classico’s complexity and distinctive quality. Result: Complete wines.

2005: The year began with a rainy but mild spring in the heart of Chianti Classico. Flowering occurred under non-optimal weather conditions, but grape development in a warm and dry period slowed growth. Mid-August rains restored the water balance and accelerated maturation. In early September, high temperatures and humidity required leaf thinning of the grape clusters. Nel primo settembre, alte temperature e umidità hanno richiesto una sfogliatura dei grappoli. Result: Lively wines.

2006: In Chianti Classico, the spring was quite rainy, helping to replenish soil moisture. However, consistently below-average temperatures delayed flowering and fruit set. Subsequently, a hot and dry summer favored grape accumulation. August brought good ventilation, ensuring even maturation processes. Harvesting began about 10 days later than average, preserving must acidity and low pH. This vintage demonstrated the region’s resilience, yielding fresh and structured wines. Result: Balanced wines.

2007: In the picturesque Chianti Classico, the year started unusually early due to mild spring temperatures. However, a cold spell during flowering reduced fruit set, especially in late-ripening varieties. From mid-June to July, low rainfall and scorching heat slowed vine growth. Fortunately, beneficial rains in early August and September alleviated water stress and restored optimal harvesting conditions in October. What began as a concern ended with excellent characteristics and remarkable aging potential. This vintage has become an integral part of oenological culture Result: Mature wines.

2008: In the stunning Chianti Classico landscape, the 2008 vintage was marked by high luminosity and elevated temperatures in July and August. However, the period up to September had good rainfall and cooler temperatures, followed by a warm and dry October. Harvesting commenced in early September and extended beyond mid-October. Grapes matured slowly, accumulating anthocyanins and soft tannins. Varietal aromas remained uncompromised by overripening. This vintage is considered a Chianti Classico classic, producing wines suitable for aging that truly represent the terroir. Result: Harmonious wines.

2009: In Chianti Classico, the 2009 vintage began with a mild and very rainy winter, leading to early budbreak, similar to previous years. A warm spring encouraged vigorous vine growth. The summer was hot and dry, leading to an early harvest with reduced yields. Though not as extraordinary as 1997-1995, it still yielded decent wines that reflected Chianti Classico’s character. Result: Vigorous wines.

2010: In the Chianti Classico region, the 2010 vintage had an unusual climatic pattern. The season started with mild temperatures and low rainfall, facilitating vineyard operations and vegetative growth. However, between late March and early April, cold nights damaged early buds on the earliest vines, reducing their production. From mid-April onwards, the region enjoyed a mild spring and summer with little rainfall but never excessively high temperatures and excellent temperature fluctuations. Consequently, the harvest began late but produced wines with good acidity and aging potential. This vintage emphasized the region’s adaptability. Result: Playful wines.

2011: In the heart of Chianti Classico, the winter featured mild temperatures and low rainfall, leading to early spring budbreak compared to previous years. This early phenological development continued throughout the season, aided by high temperatures and drought. Harvesting occurred slightly ahead of schedule. The grapes were very sweet and rich in polyphenolic compounds, with good freshness and final balance. This year highlighted the vines’ resilience and ability to produce high-quality grapes. Result: Concentrated wines.

2012: In the picturesque Chianti Classico, the winter was one of the mildest and driest in the last 20 years, with abundant April and May rainfall. The vines had early budbreak as in previous years but experienced slow growth due to the May rains. The summer was very hot, with prolonged drought affecting grape maturation , although the harvest started early. The wines maintained high freshness despite the scorching summer. Elegance, freshness, and good acidity were the most relevant features of this vintage, exceeding expectations. Result: Fruity wines.

2013: In the heart of Chianti Classico, the 2013 vintage enjoyed ideal climatic conditions. Adequate winter rainfall ensured an optimal vegetative restart. Followed by well-distributed precipitation up to June, the vine growth was supported. July and August had no significant rainfall but avoided water stress thanks to high temperatures and significant temperature fluctuations. Ideal grape maturation resulted in an early harvest, producing wines that reflect the perfection of grape maturation. Result: Long-lived wines.

2014: In Chianti Classico, 2014 was an exception, marked by exceptional rainfall throughout the vine’s growing cycle. It had been decades since such rainy and cold spring and summer conditions were seen. The main consequences were slow grape ripening and significant vineyard work to ensure their health. Wines from this year are distinguished by great freshness, acidity, and modest tannins. This vintage demonstrated the adaptability of viticulturists in the face of extraordinary weather challenges. Result: Fresh wines.

2015: In Chianti Classico, abundant late winter rains and low spring temperatures delayed vineyard growth. Still, they provided a good water supply, crucial for dealing with one of the hottest summers in recent years. Drought and high temperatures accelerated grape technological ripening. Fantastic temperature fluctuations from mid-August to mid-September completed excellent phenolic ripening. The 2015 vintage yielded wines of incredible complexity, both aromatically and structurally. This year tested vine resilience but resulted in wines of remarkable depth. Result: Full-bodied wines.

2016: In the heart of Chianti Classico, early winter months witnessed mild temperatures and sporadic frosts. Early spring months were marked by substantial rainfall, promoting plant growth. However, as the season progressed, the rains ceased, leading to a rather dry and hot spring and summer. The harvest occurred on schedule, resulting in a balanced vintage. The wines showcased the beauty and tradition of the region. Result: Aromatic wines.

2017: In the picturesque Chianti Classico, the winter began with mild temperatures and little rainfall, leading to early spring budbreak. This early phenological development continued throughout the season, aided by high temperatures and drought. La vendemmia è stata leggermente anticipata, portando a uve molto zuccherine e concentrate sotto il profilo polifenolico. This year demonstrated the region’s ability to face climatic challenges and produce high-quality grapes. Result: Deep wines.

2018: In the heart of Chianti Classico, spring 2018 experienced significant rainfall, fostering vigorous vineyard growth. From the end of June, the climate conditions were excellent, with hot days and cool evenings. Harvesting took place under ideal conditions, resulting in excellent grape maturation and wines characterized by elegance and freshness. This year showed how the combination of spring rains and optimal summer conditions can produce high-quality wines. Result: Spicy wines.

2019: In the charming Chianti Classico, the 2019 season started with unusual drought in the early months of the year, followed by substantial rainfall until May. Spring showers were essential for healthy new growth. The temperatures in 2019 were in line with local averages, and summer rains prevented any water stress in the vineyards. The 2019 vintage is undoubtedly an excellent year in Chianti Classico, producing complex and structured wines. Result: Mineral wines.

2020: In the heart of Chianti Classico, the year began with mild temperatures and little rainfall in the early months, facilitating vineyard operations and vegetative growth. Unfortunately, between late March and early April, some cold nights damaged early buds on the earliest vines, reducing their production. From mid-April onwards, the region enjoyed a mild spring and summer with minimal precipitation, along with temperatures that were never excessively high and excellent temperature fluctuations. Hence, a dry but not excessively hot summer, with a significantly reduced grape yield. The 2020 vintage will not be remembered for quantity but for its quality in Chianti Classico. Result: Floral wines.

2021: In the heart of Chianti Classico, the 2021 vintage will be remembered for low rainfall. After good precipitation from January to April, a gradual drought with a complete absence of rain from mid-April to mid-October was observed. With mild temperatures, the vegetative growth was relatively early but exposed the vines to partial frost damage in early April. The rest of the spring maintained below-average temperatures. From June onwards, typical summer temperatures were recorded, with dry and breezy days. Grapes reached maturation at the usual pace and with excellent health. Despite the lack of rain, it produced low juice yield and below-average wine production, but the quality remains high, characterized by concentration and balance. This vintage in Chianti Classico demonstrated the vines’ adaptability to challenging climatic conditions, producing high-quality wines. Result: Austere wines.

2022: In the heart of Chianti Classico, 2022 opened with an exceptionally dry winter, featuring prolonged periods of high pressure and remarkable temperature fluctuations. Vines sprouted later than in previous years but then grew vigorously, aided by above-average temperaturesfrom May. From a production perspective, the potential fertility of the vintage was very good, and flowering resulted in good fruit set. A dry summer led to moderate berry growth and occasional water stress. Rainfall from mid-August allowed plants to accelerate physiological processes slowed by the drought. In conjunction with the rains, isolated hail events damaged part of the production. The 2022 harvest delivered perfectly healthy grapes with higher sugar content than in recent years and acidity levels consistent with previous years. Small berry size and the concentration achieved during the summer characterized a vintage suitable for the production of structured and long-aging red wines. In Chianti Classico, this vintage showcased viticulturists’ resilience in the face of complex weather challenges, producing high-quality wines that fully represent the territory. Result: Warm wines.

2023: The winter featured very low temperatures and sporadic frost during the early months of the year. Spring saw abundant rainfall, promoting both flowering and the development of fungal diseases, notably Downy Mildew. The summer featured a series of extreme weather events, intense heat, and irregular rainfall, posing a significant challenge to vine growers. The adaptive management strategies mitigated adverse weather conditions and allowed some vineyards to achieve good grape ripening, albeit with significantly reduced yields compared to previous years, even reaching estimates of production up to 50% lower.

Our Production

Gran Selezione DOCG

Enhanced by a long aging process, first in wood and then in bottle, Casa Sola’s Gran Selezione aims to highlight the elegant side of Sangiovese.

casasola granselezione big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Riserva DOCG

In the finest vintages, we select our best Sangiovese to craft our reserve wine.

By paying close attention to every step of the winemaking and aging process (starting with wood and then bottle aging), we aim to enhance its characteristics, adding complexity and roundness.

casasola riserva 2011 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Chianti Classico DOCG

The Chianti Classico from Casa Sola is known as the wine that captures the intensity and freshness of our terroir. We’ve paired Sangiovese’s austere elegance with a small blend of Canaiolo, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Merlot to increase its complexity, all the while preserving our regional identity.

casasola chianti classico 2013 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Montarsiccio IGT

It is no surprise that the world’s most popular varieties have also shown excellent expression here at Casa Sola. Since 1987, at Casa Sola, we have been blending Cabernet and Merlot – renowned for their robust fruitiness and supple tannins – with a touch of Sangiovese in our Montarsiccio.

Esteemed as a ‘Supertuscan’ for its deep aromas and velvety structure.

casasola montarsiccio 2009 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Pergliamici Rosso IGT

We follow tradition by hanging freshly picked Malvasia and Trebbiano grapes. In a dedicated ventilated room, we let the clusters dry for about 4 months to concentrate the sugars. After a gentle pressing, the must is fermented and aged in small barrels (caratelli) for 5 years.

casasola pergliamici rosso big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Pergliamici Bianco IGT

Designed to be an easy-drinking wine, fruity and fresh, Pergliamici seeks to revisit the legacy of Chianti Classico by presenting a modern take on the flavors and sensations of the past.

A straightforward, honest wine, that is perfect for sharing with friends.

casasola montarsiccio 2009 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Vin Santo

The ExtraVirgin Olive Oil Chianti Classico DOP has a centuries-old tradition passed down from generation to generation, dating back to the 1300s.

Combining Frantoio, Leccino, Correggilo, and Moraiolo olives in harmonious balance, Casa Sola’s Chianti Classico DOP olive oil stands out for its subtly spicy flavor, accompanied by a gentle bitterness, and exceptional nutritional qualities.

casasola vinsanto big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti

Olio Evo DOP

Designed to be an easy-drinking wine, fruity and fresh, Pergliamici seeks to revisit the legacy of Chianti Classico by presenting a modern take on the flavors and sensations of the past.

A straightforward, honest wine, that is perfect for sharing with friends.

casasola olio bottiglia 050 big - Fattoria Casa Sola Winery e Agriturismo nel Chianti